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14.3.11

The Mission & Castro

The Mission has a tendency to be warmer and sunnier than the rest of the city. This climatic phenomenon becomes apparent to visitors who walk downhill from 24th Street in the west from Noe Valley (where clouds from Twin Peaks in the west tend to accumulate on foggy days) towards Mission Street in the east, partly because Noe Valley is on higher ground whereas the Inner Mission is at a lower elevation.


Spanish missionaries arrived in the area during the late 18th century. They found these people living in two villages on Mission Creek. It was here that a Spanish priest named Father Francisco Palóu founded Mission San Francisco de Asis on June 29, 1776.

[Mission Mural Project - Precita Eyes]

La Misión es un barrio cálido, de culturas mezcladas, de influencias sudamericanas, de ganas de superación y de COLOR que inunda casas, murales, mesas y corazones.



























En este callejón, los murales lo cubren todo, coloreando unos muros de la misma manera que la diversidad colorea las calles del entorno.







Perfecta introducción para Castro, la zona gay de SF.


Mural reivindicando a las líderes femeninas!


The Castro came of age as a gay center following the Summer of Love in the neighboring Haight-Ashbury district in 1967. The gathering brought tens of thousands of middle-class youth from all over the United States. The neighborhood, previously known as Eureka Valley, became known as the Castro, after the landmark theatre by that name near the corner of Castro and Market Streets. Many San Francisco gays also moved there after about 1970 from what had been the formerly most prominent gay neighborhood, Polk Gulch, because large Victorian houses were available at low rents or available for purchase for low down payments when their former middle-class owners had fled to the suburbs.


Harvey Milk, with his store Castro Camera, had been changed by his experience with the counterculture of the 1960s. His store was used as his campaign headquarters and remains a tourist destination to date. By 1973, Harvey Milk, who would become the most famous resident of the neighborhood, opened a camera store, Castro Camera, and began political involvement as a gay activist, further contributing to the notion of the Castro as a gay destination




Here we come baby, Castro street!




The first train I took in San Francisco!! The F, from Embarcadero to Fisherman's Wharf!
God save The Gay.

I try to keep rainbows in mind, forget about the harsh reality in Japan. The day wasn't sunny, which was a real pity, as the beautiful colors that filled up these walls didn't look pretty enough. But in any case, I guess you get an idea, right? And I get my little daily fantasy of flying back to the sunny warmth...
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